Audi a1 2016 review




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    Sporty, spacious A1 supermini packs Audi quality into a compact body. A minor facelift happened in , but exterior changes were small.

    The Audi A1 is a compact car with a body that doesn't extend far out of 26 included in the JD Power Vehicle Dependability Survey.

    The difference in performance is very very subtle that you don't really notice and the transmission is geared just as well. You can now play Atari games on your Tesla. T he A1 is a proper Audi in miniature, with clear instruments, slick controls and materials that are easy on both the eye and the fingertips. While the rear does have some rather decent legroom for a small car, it does however lack headroom even for my rather average size. The side mirrors now come with turn signal repeaters.

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    Please refresh the page and retry. T he idea behind the A1 is so simple that it's amazing nobody thought of it earlier. Essentially, it takes the high-quality interior and prestige badge that have made Audis so popular and puts them in a small, city-friendly package. S lim windows and cramped footwells make the A1 feel rather claustrophobic in the front seats, and long-legged drivers might find the left foot rest in the automatic versions is uncomfortably close.

    In the rear, meanwhile, legroom and head room are both at a premium — especially with the hard-backed Super Sport seats, which you should avoid because they make the rear seats unusable for all but children and the smallest of adults. D iesel versions of the A1 are a touch on the noisy side, so you should probably go for a petrol engine instead, which is much quieter.

    The S-line specification is also best avoided because this brings sports suspension that results in an unsettled, joggly ride, and larger wheels that transmit more tyre noise into the car. However, Sport models cope well enough with bumps, while the softest, SE-spec cars are genuinely comfortable. Well-bolstered front seats that hold their occupants firmly in place help, and the steering wheel can be adjusted for both height and reach, so it's easy to find a comfortable driving position.

    T he A1 is a proper Audi in miniature, with clear instruments, slick controls and materials that are easy on both the eye and the fingertips. T he Audi A1 is a compact car with a body that doesn't extend far beyond its wheels, so it's easy to place on the road. Quick, responsive steering also helps, offering enough resistance to instil confidence while still being light for parking.

    It can be slow to react when pulling away, and it surges annoyingly as you come to a halt, which makes creeping forward in traffic a jerky affair.

    T he Audi A1 is available with 1. If outright performance isn't a concern, the 1. If you crave more power, even the cheaper 1. Meanwhile, the more powerful and more expensive version makes the A1 feel properly sporty, but if you really want a fast A1 go for the four-wheel-drive S1 hot hatch, which is a hoot to drive. Responsive, informative steering is a bonus, too, even if it is a touch on the light side.

    Audis might feel solid, but their reputation for reliability is otherwise; the manufacturer finished 22 nd out of 26 included in the JD Power Vehicle Dependability Survey, falling behind such rivals as Vauxhall and Mini. T he A1 comes with a three-year, 60,mile warranty, which is about the bare minimum you get in the UK these days. T he more powerful version of the 1. However, our experience suggests that this engine struggles to do much more than the lower-powered 1.

    That said, the 1. Of course, choosing a more mainstream hatchback like the Ford Fiesta will cost you significantly less, and a Mini also looks to be better value, too. I nsurance costs are rather higher than for its mainstream rivals, but the A1 will retain its value better which helps redress the balance. Leasing costs, meanwhile, are on a par with the Mini and Vauxhall Adam, although again, more mainstream hatchbacks can be had for less. But since then, safety equipment has moved on, and the A1 has not.

    The A1 can do neither. T he entry-level A1 SE is not particularly well-equipped. F or those luxuries, you have to upgrade to the Sport version, which also gives you 16in alloy wheels, voice control, and some slivers of aluminium trim. S-Line models, meanwhile, add Xenon headlamps, a sportier bodykit, a multi-function steering wheel and upgraded seats. No model comes with an awful lot of equipment, then, compared with rivals — even the entry-level Vauxhall Adam, which costs quite a lot less, gets Bluetooth and cruise control as standard, for example.

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